Invited Speakers List


Immanuel Bloch






Immanuel Bloch


Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik (MPQ)
Ludwigs-Maximilian Universität (LMU)
München


www.quantum-munich.de




Immanuel Bloch is Professor of Physics at the Ludwigs-Maximilian University and director of the Max-Planck Institute of Quantum Optics in Munich. Following his Diplom at the university of Bonn he performed research with Mark Kasevich in the US and graduated with T.W. Hänsch. Soon he became a professor at the Johannes-Gutenberg University in Mainz and later in Munich. Professor Blochs major interests so far have been the experimental realization of strongly correlated quantum phases with ultracold atoms in the quantum phase transition from a superfluid to a Mott insulator. This work has opened a new research field at the interface of condensed matter physics, atomic and molecular physics as well as quantum information science.


Jeroen van den Brink



Jeroen van den Brink


Leibniz Institute for Solid State
and Materials Research
Dresden, Germany

www.ifw-dresden.de



Jeroen van den Brink is the director of the Institute for Theoretical Solid State Physics at the IFW in Dresden, and a professor of theoretical condensed matter physics at the Technical University in Dresden. Following his graduation at the Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands) he was PostDoc at the Max-Plack Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart and after various international positions he proceeded to Dresden in 2009. Professor van den Brink is working on the development of conceptional models materials and nano science as well as on a broad area of theory of quantum matter, correlated electron systems and many body physics.


Philippe Bouyer




Philippe Bouyer


Laboratoire Photonique, Numérique et Nanosciences
UMR5298 - LP2NIOGS - CNRS
Université Bordeaux 1, France


www.philippebouyer.fr/




Philippe Bouyer is a professor and director of the Laboratoire Photonique, Numérique et Nanosciences in Bordeaux, France since 2011. He was PostDoc and visiting scientist with Mark Kasevich in Stanford before he came back to France and became a Directeur de Recherche within the CNRS where he was part of the Fundamental Physics Advisory Group until 2012. Professor Bouyer is working on BECs, cold atoms and atom interferometry as well as Anderson localization of cold atoms.


Michel Brune






Michel Brune

Laboratoire Kastler Brossel
Collège de France, École Normale Supérieure
Université Pierre et Marie Curie
CNRS, Paris France

http://www.cqed.org





Michel Brune, born in 1964, graduated at Ecole Normale Supérieure from 1983 to 1987. He defended his Phd in 1988, supervised by S. Haroche, and his habilitation in 2001. He works in the Laboratoire Kastler Brossel at ENS. He is director of research (CNRS position) and professor at École Polytechnique (partial time). He is director of the Young Team Incubator at the Physics Institute of Collège de France. His scientific work, performed at laboratoire Kastler Brossel, is focused on experiments with simple and well-controlled quantum systems for exploring the most fundamental features of quantum theory. Using Rydberg atoms coupled one by one to trapped microwave photons stored in a high Q superconducting cavity, he managed to prepare a "Schödinger cat state" and to monitor its decoherence, to perform quantum non-demonlition (QND) detection of photons and to observe quantum jump of the cavity field. These experiments, distinguished by the 2012 Nobel Prize awarded to S. Haroche, directly illustrate the consequences of quantum measurement postulate. They demonstrate the role of entanglement and non-locality by allowing engineering deterministically quantum states. More recently, Michel Brune also became the principal investigator of a superconducting atom-chip experiment achieving Bose-Einstein condensation in a cryogenic environment. This setup is now devoted to the study of dipole-dipole interaction between ultra-cold Rydberg atoms for performing quantum simulations.


Georgios Ctistis










Georgios Ctistis

Saxion University of Applied Sciences
Enschede
The Netherlands

www.saxion.edu




Georgios Ctistis is Assistant Professor at Saxion University of Applied Sciences. He studied physics at the FU Berlin where he received his PhD degree in 2006 in the field of non-linear near-field magneto-optics. He went then for a post-doctoral position tot he ceasar research center in Bonn, where he established a research route on magnteo-plasmonics, studying the transmission of light through magnetic nano-hole arrays. In 2008 he joined the Complex Photonic Systems group first at AMOLF and then at the University of Twente, where his main interest lies on the dynamic control of light-matter interaction of nanophotonic structures.


Maria Daghofer



Maria Daghofer

Institut für Funktionelle Materie und Quantentechnologien
University of Stuttgart
Germany

fmq.uni-stuttgart.de/



Maria Daghofer is a professor of theoretical physics at the University of Stuttgart since 2014. She obtained her PhD in Graz, Austria, in 2004 and was a postdoc at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research (Stuttgart, Germany) and the University of Tennessee (US) before moving to Dresden in 2009. There she was Emmy-Noether fellow at the Leibniz Institute for Solid-State and Materials Research Dresden. Maria Daghofer works on the theory of strongly correlated electron systems, currently focusing on the interplay of correlations and topology.



Thomas Elsasser






Thomas Elsässer

Max-Born-Institute for Nonlinear Optics
and Short-Pulse Spectroscopy
Humboldt University
Berlin, Germany

mbi-berlin.de/elsasser







Thomas Elsaesser is a director at the Max-Born-Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short-Pulse Spectroscopy, Berlin, Germany, and holds a joint appointment as a professor for experimental physics with Humboldt University, Berlin. Ultrafast processes in condensed matter represent his main area of research. Multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy of hydrogen bonds in liquids and macromolecules, ultrafast dynamics of low-energy excitations in solids, and x-ray studies of ultrafast structural dynamics are his present research topics. Thomas Elsaesser received a Dr. rer. nat. degree from the Technical University of Munich in 1986 and worked there as a research associate until 1993. In 1990, he spent a postdoc period at AT&T Bell Laboratories, Holmdel, NJ. He finished his habilitation at the TU Munich in 1991 and joined the newly established Max-Born-Institute in 1993.



Thomas Gasenzer






Thomas Gasenzer

Kirchhoff Institut für Physik
Universität Heidelberg
Germany

thphys.uni-heidelberg.de/~gasenzer





Thomas Gasenzer is a professor of theoretical physics at Heidelberg University. His current research interests are in the dynamics of many-particle quantum systems with a focus on ultracold atomic gases. He graduated at the Department of Physics in Heidelberg in 1998 on Atomic Parity Violation. After a postdoctoral research period as a Humboldt and Marie Curie fellow in the group of Prof. Keith Burnett at the University of Oxford he has built up a research group at the Institute for Theoretical Physics in Heidelberg. He took up a Heisenberg fellowship in 2007 and in 2009 worked as a visiting researcher at JILA, Boulder. In 2014, he joined the Kirchhoff Institute for Physics.



Antoine Georges





Antoine Georges

College de France
Institut de Physique
Chaire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee
Paris, France

cpht.polytechnique.fr/cpth/correl/





Antoine Georges graduated from Ecole Polytechnique in 1983, and joined Ecole Normale Superieure (Laboratoire de Physique Théorique) for graduate studies. After initial steps (and a few publications) in high-energy theory, he worked for several years on disordered systems, most notably spin-glasses and non-Brownian diffusion in disordered environments. Until 1991 he worked in Princton and started collaborating with Gabriel Kotliar to develop the mapping onto a self-consistent quantum impurity model, which is at the heart of the Dynamical Mean-Field Theory approach to strongly correlated fermion systems. Recently, his research has focused mostly on the physics of copper-oxide high-temperature superconductors, iron pnictides, and the emerging field of condensed matter physics with ultra-cold atoms in optical lattices. In 2003, Professor Georges moved to Ecole Polytechnique, where he has set up a research group on strongly correlated systems in the Centre de Physique Théorique. In 2009, he has been awarded the chair of Condensed Matter Physics at Collège de France.



Emanuel Gull




Emanuel Gull

Computational Condensed Matter Physics
Department of Physics
Michigan University

www-personal.umich.edu/~egull/





Emanuel Gull is a professor in the general area of computational condensed matter physics with a focus on the study of correlated electronic systems in and out of equilibrium. He is an expert on Monte Carlo methods for quantum systems and one of the developers of the diagrammatic ‘continuous-time’ quantum Monte Carlo methods. His recent work includes the study of the Hubbard model using large cluster dynamical mean field methods, the development of vertex function methods for optical (Raman and optical conductivity) probes, and the development of bold line diagrammatic algorithms for quantum impurities out of equilibrium. Professor Gull is involved in the development of open source computer programs for strongly correlated systems.



Walter Hofstetter



Walter Hofstetter

Quantum Matter Theory
Institut für Theoretische Physik
Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität
Frankfurt, Germany

http://itp.uni-frankfurt.de/cms/



Walter Hofstetter, Dr. rer. nat., Professor (W3) at the Institute of Theoretical Physics, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt/Main; 1991-1997 study of Physics at LMU München and Oxford University; 1991-1997 scholarships of the Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes and the Stiftung Maximilianeum; 1997- 2000 graduate studies at University of Augsburg (group of D. Vollhardt); 2000-2001 postdoc at University of Augsburg; 2001-2003 Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University; 2003-2004 Pappalardo Junior Fellow at MIT; 2004-2006 Professor of Physics, RWTH Aachen; since 2006 Professor of Physics (W3), Goethe- Universität Frankfurt; further academic job offers: W3 Professorship for Theoretical Physics, University of Hamburg (2008), W3 Professorship for Theoretical Physics, University of Würzburg (2009); 2005-2010 member of the “Junge Akademie” at the Berlin- Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften.



Michael Kaschke



Michael Kaschke

Fakultät für Elektrotechnik und Informationstechnik
Karlsruher Institut der Technologie (KIT)
Carl Zeiss AG
Germany

www.zeiss.de/


Michael Kaschke is a professor of the faculty of electrical engineering and information technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). He graduated with the PhD in 1988 at the Friedrich-Schiller University of Jena and became PostDoc and group leader at the Max Born Institute, Berlin. Following a research internship with IBM in Yorktown, USA, he joined Carl Zeiss as head of research and development of surgery microscopes. Since 2011 Professor Kaschke is executive chairman of the Carl Zeiss AG.



Gabriel Kotliar





Gabriel Kotliar

Serin Physics Laboratory
Rutgers University
Piscataway, USA

dmftweb.rutgers.edu


Dr Gabriel Kotliar holds a Board of Governors Professor Chair in the Physics Department at Rutgers University. He is well known for his contributions to the theory of strongly correlated and disordered electron systems. He was an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow in 1986-1988, received a Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1987, a Lady Davies Fellowship in 1994, a Guggenheim fellowship in 2003, the Blaise Pascal Chair in 2005 and the Agilent Technologies Europhysics Prize in 2006. He has been a visiting professor at the Ecole Normale and the Ecole Polytechnique in Paris and the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Dr. Kotliar has been organized and served in the the advisory board for numerous conferences and meetings. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society since 2001 and has coauthored over two hundred publications in refereed Journals. His current research interests include the theory of the Mott transition, superconductivity in strongly correlated electron systems, the electronic structure of transition metal oxides, lanthanides and actinides, and the development of first principles approaches for predicting physical properties of materials.




Dan Kulp



Daniel T. Kulp, Ph.D.

Interim Editor in Chief and Editorial Director
American Physical Society

www.aps.org/




Daniel Kulp is the Editorial Director and interim Editor in Chief for all the journals of the American Physical Society (APS). He has been with APS, working in the Editorial Office, for over 20 years and is a Fellow of the Society. During this time he has been involved in all aspects of publishing including peer-review, production, distribution, and personnel and financial management of journals. He is also part of the APS Senior Management team which helps guide the Society. With 50 full-time professional editors and 60 part-time remote Associate and Senior Editors reporting to him, Dan has become adept at "herding cats" and reaching consensus across the journals. He has also developed into the in-house expert on copyright and licensing issues, and has been at the forefront of APS's efforts in open access publishing.



Andreas Lubatsch



Andreas Lubatsch

Electrical Engineering, Precision Engineering, Information Technology
Georg-Simon-Ohm University of Applied Sciences
Nürnberg, Germany

th-nuernberg.eu/




Andreas Lubatsch started his career with the PhD at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the university of Bonn in Germany and he performed a PostDoc at the LPMMC in Grenoble, France. Andreas Lubatsch is working on self-consistent transport of light in disordered random media, Anderson localization and random lasing. Further he works on strongly correlated electronics and made substantial contributions with the first solver in non-equilibrium Floquet-Keldysh dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT), iterative perturbation theory (IPT) . He is currently Lecturer at the Department of Electrical Engineering, Precision Engineering, Information Technology at the Georg-Simon-Ohm University of Applied Sciences, Nürnberg, Germany.


Gilles Montambaux






Gilles Montambaux

Laboratoire de Physique des Solides
Université Paris-Sud
CNRS, Orsay, France

users.lps.u-psud.fr/Montambaux/




Gilles Montambaux is Research Director at the CNRS (Scientific Research National Center) in Orsay, France, and Professor at Ecole Polytechnique. His research interests in condensed matter theory of electronic systems are quantum mesoscopic quantum physics, disorder, interactions and phase coherence, low dimensional physics, graphene and artificial graphenes, Dirac matter, with new directions in the physics of cold atoms in optical lattices. He is coauthor of a book on “Mesoscopic Physics of Electrons and Photons”. He obtained his PhD at the University Paris-Sud in Orsay, followed by a postdoctoral stay at the AT&T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ..Gilles Montambaux is the founder of the National French group on Mesoscopic Physics. He has organized many conferences and schools in the field of Mesoscopic Physics, including two Les Houches summer schools. He is currently scientific editor at the European Physical Journal, and deputy director of the Paris area Doctorate School of Physics.


Markus Oberthaler




Markus Oberthaler

Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics
University of Heidelberg
Germany

kip.uni-heidelberg.de/matterwaveoptics/



Markus K. Oberthaler is a professor of experimental physics at the university of Heidelberg since 2003. His recent focus is on synthetic quantum systems, entanglement in mesoscopic gases, trace analysis at single particle level, gravity and antimatter. He graduated at the Department of Experimental Physics in Innsbruck with Anton Zeilinger in 1997 on 'Waves in periodic media'. Following a research fellowship at the University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, in the group of Prof. Keith Burnett and Dr. Christopher Foot he was awarded in 2003 the DFG Emmy Noether fellowship for his independent research group at the Optik-Zentrum Konstanz. Markus Oberthaler was awarded the Landesforschungspreis Baden-Württemberg for the observation of nonlinear tunneling of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a single Josephson junction.



Klaus Richter


Klaus Richter

Institut für Theoretische Physik
Universität Regensburg

www.physik.uni-regensburg.de/forschung/richter/





Klaus Richter is a Professor for Theoretical Physics at the University of Regensburg, Germany. His research interests range from mesoscopic physics, topological insulators and spintronics to transport of cold atoms, photonic systems and quantum chaos. Besides various aspects of quantum transport theory his expertise comprises in particular semiclassical path integral methods which has been most recently developed and applied in his group to tackle non-equilibrium quantum many-body dynamics. Klaus Richter had obtained his PhD at the University of Freiburg, Germany, in 1991. After postdoctoral stays at the University Paris-Sud in Orsay (France) and University of Augsburg (Germany) he spent 5 years as the head of a research group at the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems in Dresden, Germany. In 2001 he took up a Chair in Condensed Matter Theory in Regensburg. He was spokesperson of the Division "Dynamics and Statistical Physics" and is presently (until spring 2015) spokesperson of the Condensed Matter Section of the German Physical Society.


Ulrich Schneider





Ulrich Schneider

Cavendish Laboratory
University of Cambridge
United Kingdom

www.manybody.phy.cam.ac.uk/




Ulrich Schneider is a Lecturer in experimental physics at the Cavendish Laboratory in the University of Cambridge, UK. He is studying many-body phenomena at the interface between quantum optics and solid state physics, with a particular interest in out of equilibrium dynamics and quantum thermodynamics. Recent research topics include transport in strongly correlated systems, topological bandstructures and many-body localization. After receiving his PhD from the University of Mainz he worked as a senior scientist at the LMU & MPQ in Munich before moving to Cambridge in 2015.



Alice Sinatra


Alice Sinatra

Laboratoire Kastler Brossel
École Normale Supérieure
Paris, France

www.phys.ens.fr/~sinatra/





Alice Sinatra is a researcher in Laboratoire Kastler Brossel and Associate Professor in Pierre et Marie Curie University. Her interest is in the theory of Bose-Einstein condensates and cold gases, with focus on phase coherence, multimode and finite temperature properties. She is also interested in the use of cold atoms to create non-trivial quantum states that may be useful in metrology, for probing the frontiers between quantum and classical world and for quantum information. After a PhD in Quantum Optics in Milan University in 1997, she was Post-Doc in Laboratoire Kastler Brossel with an Individual Marie Curie Fellowship of EU and subsequently a Maitre de Conférences position in Collège de France, before obtaining a permanent position in Pierre et Marie Curie University in 2000. She received her Habilitation in 2006.



Emina Soljanin




Emina Soljanin

Department of Mathematics
Bell Labs
Murray Hill, NJ, USA

ect.bell-labs.com/who/emina/





Emina Soljanin is a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff at Bell Labs, where she works as an information, coding, and queueing theorist. Her interests and expertise are wide. Over the past quarter of the century, she has participated in numerous research and business projects, as diverse as power system optimization, magnetic recording, color space quantization, hybrid ARQ, network coding, data and network security, and quantum information theory and networking. Dr. Soljanin served as the Associate Editor for Coding Techniques, for the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, on the Information Theory Society Board of Governors, and in various roles on other journal editorial boards and conference program committees. She is a co-organizer of the DIMACS 2001-2005 Special Focus on Computational Information Theory and Coding and 2011-2015 Special Focus on Cybersecurity. Dr. Soljanin has mentored many summer interns, Ph.D. students, and postdocs, and have co-authored two monographs on network coding. She is a member of AMS and IEEE Fellow.



BVT



Bart van Tiggelen

Laboratoire de Physique et Modélisation des Milieux Condensés (LPMMC), CNRS
Université Joseph Fourier
Grenoble, France

lpm2c.grenoble.cnrs.fr/spip.php?article303&lang=fr




Bart van Tiggelen is a Research Professor with the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) in Grenoble, France. He developed novel concepts (energy velocity, point scatterers, Photon Hall Effect, C0 speckle) in electromagnetic wave propagation in disordered media and later in liquid crystals. He has also made contributions to acoustic and seismic wave scattering. He participated in many theoretical and experimental projects of Anderson localization and mesoscopic physics with light, microwaves, sound and matter waves. His recent research interests focus on quantum-field theory of the quantum vacuum. He is currently Deputy Director at CNRS in charge of theoretical and computational physics.



Matthias Weidemüller







Matthias Weidemüller

Physikalisches Institut
Universität Heidelberg
Germany

www.physi.uni-heidelberg.de/








Matthias Weidemüller is Chair Professor for Experimental Physics at the University of Heidelberg and Director of the Heidelberg Center for Quantum Dynamics. He currently also serves as the Dean of the Department for Physics and Astronomy. After having studied physics and philosophy in Bonn and Munich, he worked with Serge Haroche at Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris and at the Max-Planck Institute for Quantum Optics under the supervision of Prof. T.W. Hänsch. He received his PhD from the University of Munich in 1995. He then went as a EU Marie-Curie fellow to the University of Amsterdam and the FOM-Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics. He held a position as head of the “Laser Cooling” group at the Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg, before being appointed as Chair Professor for Experimental Physics in Freiburg in 2003, where he stayed until 2008. Since 2013 he is setting up a laboratory in Shanghai as part-time professor at the University of Science and Technology of China in the framework of the 1000Talent-Program of the Chinese Government. His group investigates atomic and molecular quantum aggregates with respect to their interactions on different levels of complexity, using modern methods of quantum control and quantum engineering.



Martin Weitz







Martin Weitz

Quantum Optics
Institute of Applied Physics
Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-University

Bonn, Germany

iap.uni-bonn.de/ag_weitz/



Martin Weitz is a Professor for Experimental Physics at the University of Bonn in Germany. He studied physics and electrical engineering at the University of Kaiserslautern and the Technical University of Munich. He received his PhD from the University of Munich for work on precision spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen under supervision of Prof. T. W. Hänsch. After a postdoctoral stay at Stanford University and joining the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics in Garching he became Professor at the University of Tübingen in 2001. Since 2006 he is full professor at the University of Bonn. In 2012 he received an Advanced Grant of the European Research Council for research on Bose-Einstein condensation of photons in optical microcavities. His current research interests include collective photonic effects, the quantum physics of ultracold atomic gases in optical lattices, and novel laser cooling techniques.




Thomas Wellens





Thomas Wellens

Quantenoptik und -statistik
University of Freiburg
Freiburg, Germany

omnibus.uni-freiburg.de/~tw509/



Thomas Wellens studied physics from 1993 to 1998 at Regensburg University, LMU Munich, and the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics in Garching (Germany). For his PhD studies on “Control and Entanglement of Quantum States”, under supervision of Andreas Buchleitner, he went to the Max-Planck-Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems in Dresden. After obtaining the PhD in 2002, he spent 3 years in France, working on multiple scattering of light in cold atomic gases at the Institut Non-Linéaire de Nice and the Laboratoire Kastler Brossel (Paris). From 2005 to 2007, he was PostDoc at Erlangen-Nürnberg University, before he came to Freiburg University in October 2007, where he completed the Habilitation in May 2010. His main research interests are: quantum transport, multiple scattering theory, quantum optics and cold matter.



Klaus Ziegler




Klaus Ziegler

Institut für Physik
University of Augsburg
Augsburg, Germany

rz.uni-augsburg.de/~klausz/



Klaus Ziegler is Professor for Theoretical Physics at the University of Augsburg, Germany. His research is related to field-theoretical descriptions of large scale phenomena in condensed matter systems. This includes localization in disordered systems, many-body systems near phase transitions, phase separation in atomic systems, Jahn-Teller effect, random gap systems, and systems near spectral degeneracies (e.g., graphene, topological insulators). More recently, he has worked on Hilbert-space localization and dynamical entanglement in closed quantum systems and geometric states in strongly disordered photonic systems. Klaus Ziegler received his PhD from the University of Heidelberg and worked as a postdoc in various universities and research institutes (Essen, Saclay, Karlsruhe, Harvard, Stuttgart and Dresden).